Apple MacBook won’t let you watch iTunes movies on some displays

November 19, 2008

This one is slowly bubbling to a frenzy. The new aluminum MacBook has turned up the heat on how aggressively it will protect iTunes video content from being output to an external display. In plain English, if you hook your new MacBook up to a display that is not DPDC-compliant, you will get an error message and you will not be able to play the movies you bought on iTunes. For technical details read this excellent summary from Ars Technica, always a reliable source. 

There are many angry posts going around online, including on Apple’s user forums where people are, appropriately, miffed that they can’t watch content they’ve paid for on legitimate devices (notably, projectors and older TVs, anything that requires a conversion from a digital to an analog or non DPDC-compliant digital signal).  My favorite comment on the user forum was from Al Knowles, who said:

Same problem here as well. I guess they want to be sure we HAVE to buy an
Apple TV.
Not gonna happen.
I’ll buy DVD’s at my local retailer before that happens.

Talk about drastic measures! As easy as it would be to flay Apple for this one. I have to point the finger at the people behind this: the movie studios. They are certainly the ones forcing Apple to do this, since Apple has created a very open platform for video that requires downloading entire files in order to view them. Files which the industry fears are then subject to offline manipulation and sharing. This is in contrast to Netflix streaming, which never lets a complete copy of a movie make it onto any device. 

The industry fear is obvious: you’ll rent an HD movie on iTunes, connect it to your DVD recorder instead of your TV and output a permanent copy for your library archive. Or worse, you’ll then make copies for all your friends. So they figured they can just rely on technology to prevent you from connecting to an unapproved device. The rub comes when you find out how many “unapproved” devices are still legitimate — at least from a consumer’s perspective. And in the end, it’s the consumer’s perspective that will determine whether people turn to alternate means to scratch the video itch. And yes, under alternate means I am including piracy.

What about you: bad call for Apple? Is this just the big, bad movie studios? Do you think Apple will have to relent in response to user outcry?

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